article thumbnail

Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is an interesting story about the evolutionary value of a meat-based diet

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Meat

Animal Ethics

I foresee a day, perhaps not far in the future, in which it is illegal to raise cows, pigs, and other animals for food. The ground for this will not be animal welfare, as you might expect, but environmentalism. Lawmakers, perhaps as a result of an international treaty, will prohibit the intensive rearing of at least large hoofed animals for food, on the ground that it is damaging to the natural environment. Individual animals, qua sentient beings, have intrinsic value.

Meat 40
article thumbnail

A Question for Animal Ethics Readers

Animal Ethics

Then, click on "Comments" below to answer the question that Keith posed on his personal blog : Has anyone out there met someone who was persuaded to give up eating meat as a result of an argument? I'd love to know whether philosophical reflection and argumentation has had an impact on your moral attitudes toward animals or on the moral attitudes towards animals of someone you know. Please read the post by Megan McArdle that Keith linked to in his post from yesterday.

article thumbnail

Sustainable Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times op-ed column about "sustainable meat

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Cloned Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about the cloning of animals for meat

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Red Meat

Animal Ethics

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Roger Scruton on the Duty to Eat Meat

Animal Ethics

A great number of animals owe their lives to our intention to eat them. If we value animal life and animal comfort, therefore, we should endorse our carnivorous habits, provided it really is life , and not living death, on which those habits feed. We should not abandon our meat-eating habits, but remoralize them, by incorporating them into affectionate human relations, and using them in the true Homeric manner, as instruments of hospitality, conviviality and peace.

2011 77
article thumbnail

In Vitro Meat

Animal Ethics

PETA is offering a $1,000,000 reward to anyone who creates commercially viable in vitro meat. I don't see any ethical problem with producing or consuming such meat. Do you? Addendum: Here is a New York Times story about the reward

PETA 40
article thumbnail

"A Meat-Crazed Society"

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times op-ed column by philosopher Gary Steiner

article thumbnail

Growing Meat vs. Going Vegetarian

Animal Ethics

In today's Dot Earth post " Can People Have Meat and a Planet, Too? ," Andrew Revkin explores the brave new world of growing meat cultures in vitro as a more humane and possibly more environmentally friendly way of producing meat. Every day, some people switch from meat-based diets to vegetarian diets. Some people make the switch for ethical reasons, others for health reasons, others out of concern for the environment, and some for a combination of all these reasons.

2008 46
article thumbnail

Designer Meat

Animal Ethics

Bob Smith sent a link to this. My first reaction was revulsion. But is it any more revolting than factory farming

article thumbnail

Should We Legalize Dog Meat?

Animal Ethics

Should we legalize dog meat for human consumption? Saletan discusses some reader reactions to his first post on legalizing dog meat here. Should we be eating dog meat For a discussion of the issue, see William Saletan’s recent post at the Human Nature Blog. What's next? Soylent green? Weigh in. What do you think?

2008 40
article thumbnail

A Self-Interested Reason to Not Eat Meat

Animal Ethics

Here’s another self-interested reason to not eat meat: Drug-resistant bacteria are routinely found in beef, chicken, and pork sold in supermarkets. To find out more of what the meat industry and pharmaceutical companies don't want you to know, read this Associated Press column by Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza. Many of these antibiotics are routinely added to the feed of healthy animals to promote rapid weight gain. Make a conscious choice to not eat meat.

article thumbnail

The True Costs of Eating Meat

Animal Ethics

McWilliams highlights the true environmental costs of eating meat: The livestock industry as a result of its reliance on corn and soy-based feed accounts for over half the synthetic fertilizer used in the United States, contributing more than any other sector to marine dead zones. Nearly 70 percent of all the antibiotics produced are fed to farmed animals to prevent (not treat) disease. To quit eating meat is to dismantle the global food apparatus at its foundation."

article thumbnail

"The Carbon Footprint of Meat"

Animal Ethics

One of my students directed my attention to this news story

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Meat and Romance

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about mixed couples, and no, I'm not talking about race, religion, or politics

article thumbnail

The Economics of Meat

Animal Ethics

Someone sent a link to this blog post, which shows why economics is known as "the dismal science." It also lends credence to the dictum that economists know the cost of everything and the value of nothing

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Peter Singer on Meat-Eating

Animal Ethics

Meat 40
article thumbnail

The Politics of Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is a Wall Street Journal column about foie gras

article thumbnail

Meat-Eating and the Environment

Animal Ethics

Vegetarianism is overdetermined, in the sense that there is more than one sufficient reason for being a vegetarian. Here is one determination of it

article thumbnail

Meat, Cancer, and the Cumulative Case for Ethical Vegetarianism

Animal Ethics

Ethical vegetarianism is the thesis that killing and eating animals is morally wrong whenever equally nutritious plant-based alternatives are available. The case for ethical vegetarianism starts with several uncontroversial premises. Virtually everyone agrees that: (1) It is wrong to cause a conscious sentient animal to suffer for no good reason. It is not just a few outspoken animal rights fanatics who hold this view. Cohen, The Animal Rights Debate , p.

2008 43
article thumbnail

Henry S. Salt (1851-1939) on the Wastefulness of Meat-Eating

Animal Ethics

2009 43
article thumbnail

Veganism

Animal Ethics

Not all bodybuilders are meat-eaters. See here

Vegan 48
article thumbnail

Vegetarianism

Animal Ethics

According to the Wall Street Journal , vegetarians live longer than meat-eaters

article thumbnail

Animal Rights

Animal Ethics

Addendum: The argument seems to be as follows: It is inconsistent both (a) to eat meat and (b) to condemn (or mourn) the killing of Harambe; I condemn (or mourn) the killing of Harambe; therefore, I may no longer eat meat. The first premise is true and I care about inconsistency, but, since I am going to continue to eat meat, I no longer condemn (or mourn) the killing of Harambe. Good leftist that he is, Peter Singer doesn't let a crisis go to waste.

article thumbnail

Seal

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about seal meat

Seals 40
article thumbnail

Getting Your Goat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about goat meat

Meat 40
article thumbnail

Abstention

Animal Ethics

Some people abstain from meat for religious rather than moral reasons. See here

Morals 40
article thumbnail

Obesity

Animal Ethics

On the relation between obesity and meat-eating, see here

2007 40
article thumbnail

Bison

Animal Ethics

Buffalo meat is all the rage. See here

Buffalo 40
article thumbnail

From Today's Los Angeles Times

Animal Ethics

To the editor: The gorilla Harambe’s killing at the Cincinnati Zoo surely calls our society to ask if it is moral or just to keep animals in a prison to be used, at worst, as objects of entertainment or, at best, under the guise of “education.” (“ Harambe the gorilla dies, meat-eaters grieve ,” Opinion, June 5) Is there no accountability on the part of the parents of the child who found himself in the gorilla exhibit?

article thumbnail

Eating Rocky

Animal Ethics

Squirrel meat is all the rage in Great Britain. Forget Bambi. See here for the story

article thumbnail

Global Warmism

Animal Ethics

How big is your meat footprint? See here

2007 40
article thumbnail

A Look at Humane Farming

Animal Ethics

The film Partitions (running time: 14 min) by Audrey Kali gives an intimate glimpse of the ethical struggles that five small-scale meat farmers face when their animals are slaughtered. In this film, we see farmers interacting with the animals they will eventually transform into food (chickens, pigs and cattle). This film provides an accurate portrayal of small-scale, non-intensive animal farming.

2010 75
article thumbnail

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

31) is simply wrong in suggesting that grass-fed beef produces less methane than feed-lot meat. It is the other way around, with grass-fed animals producing up to three times more methane. In any case, globally, only 8 percent of all meat is produced in natural grazing systems, and there is little available unforested land suitable for such systems. To replace factory-farmed meat without further tropical forest destruction is impossible.

article thumbnail

Kristof

Animal Ethics

Kristof writes: "The juxtaposition of the two reviews made me wonder: Some day, will our descendants be mystified by how good and decent people in the early 21st century—that''s us—could have been so oblivious to the unethical treatment of animals?" I would replace "animals" with "fetuses." Kristof writes, by way of apology for his "hypocrisy," that he eats meat ("albeit with misgivings") and has "no compunctions about using mousetraps." Eating meat cannot be so justified.

2013 40
article thumbnail

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Let’s tell people of the quantum jump in energy efficiency that could be accomplished by eating less meat and having what meat is eaten be grass fed and pasture raised by local farmers. It’s easy to cut meat consumption if you start with one day a week of no meat.

article thumbnail

W. D. Ross (1877-1971) on the Right and the Good

Animal Ethics

The ethical theories that stress the thing done and those that stress the motive from which it is done both have some justification, for both 'the right act' and 'the morally good action' are notions of the first importance in ethics; but the two types of theory have been at cross-purposes, because they have failed to notice that they are talking about different things.

Morals 50
article thumbnail

From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

This is one of the best essays I have read on the subject of animal ethics. It is similar to Mylan Engel's essay "The Immorality of Eating Meat" because it is not dependent on any normative ethical theory or any controversial claim to animal equality, but simply shows that if we take animals seriously at all we should not eat animal products (or at least not those produced in factory farms).

2007 40
article thumbnail

Moral Vegetarianism, Part 12 of 13

Animal Ethics

The Argument from Brutalization The previous argument was based on an alleged indirect effect on human beings of not eating meat. It is argued that the killing and eating of meat indirectly tends to brutalize people. In the strong form, it maintains that eating meat (indirectly) influences people to be less kind and more violent to other people; conversely, not eating meat tends to make people more kind and less violent.

Morals 40
article thumbnail

R. G. Frey on Feeling and Principle

Animal Ethics

An enormous volume of material has already appeared on the conditions under which animals live and die on factory farms, and more is almost certainly on the way. Indeed, our feeling of revulsion may be so intense that we simply can no longer bring ourselves to eat meat. In other words, we become vegetarians, not through any decision of principle, but through being unable to bring ourselves to continue to dine upon the flesh of animals.

2008 48
article thumbnail

Goat

Animal Ethics

According to this New York Times story, goat is "the most widely consumed meat in the world

Goats 40
article thumbnail

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Hooked on Meat ,” by Mark Bittman (column, June 2): The other day, I asked the manager of our local chain grocery store why we were offered only Peruvian asparagus in the springtime. Why do we eat so much meat? Health care skyrockets out of control mainly because we have no convenient access to fresh produce and tasty, humanely raised meat products.