First Post-COVID-19 Birding Trip: Wisconsin and Horicon NWR

10,000 Birds

In late June, I flew into O’Hare and drove north to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. On eBird, Horicon NWR has nearly 300 species observed, more than 18,000 checklists, and 13 hotspots. It is a popular eBird hotspot with nearly 13,000 checklists and 260 recorded species.

If We Can Rock Together, We Can Flock Together

10,000 Birds

ALWAYS assume there is some other bird species in there that you have not found yet. Here is a flock of endangered species. Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota. Weird flocks are fun. One does not typically find a Black-crowned Night-Heron mixed in with Rock Pigeons and American Coots. I think the night-heron knows it too. Thanks for stopping in again birders. Today’s post is as simple as it can be. FLOCKS.

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Shedding Tears For Shorebirds

10,000 Birds

Most of them are essentially telling you what species they are when they talk, so just focusing on appearance may make the identification process more complicated than it has to be. Photographed at Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, ND. Their bills are obviously different lengths and shapes…they must be different species, right? Upland Sandpipers are one of the coolest and most awkward-looking of our continent’s birds. See, it’s not so scary!

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Car Birding: A Birder Litmus Test

10,000 Birds

This is what we have to remember: - Many species are easier to observe at close range from a vehicle than on foot. - This is one of many Black Terns flying low over a bridge at Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota. A Dusky Grouse scurries across the road in Grand Teton National Park, WY. I was reading Carrie’s post last month and got to thinking about car birding in general.

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Waterfowl of North America, Europe & Asia: An Identification Guide

10,000 Birds

And, the whole question of subspecies, which in the Northeast tends to focus on the Cackling Goose, but which I’m sure is a topic of fascination with other waterfowl species in all other parts of the world. Published by Princeton University Press in early 2016, Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia (I’m going to use this shortened title for the rest of the review), covers 83 species of Anseriformes–ducks, geese, and swans–of, yes, Europe, Asia and North America.