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Ohio to Phase Out Veal Crates

Critter News

Despite last year’s agreement with agribusiness interests in Ohio to ban and phase out certain cruel factory farming practices, the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (OLCSB) voted in favor of veal crate confinement. Today, we are happy to report that, thanks to the hard work and dedication of Farm Sanctuary members like you, on April 5, the OLCSB voted unanimously to reverse their decision, and to phase out the use of veal crates in Ohio.

More Clarity About Family Farms

Animal Person

In " Move to Limit 'Factor Farms' Gains Momentum " in today's New York Times , we learn that farmers in Ohio have agreed to phase out gestation crates within 15 years and veal crates by 2017. Where males and females were once put into a pen to mate, sows are now inseminated artificially and most are kept through their pregnancy in a 2-by-7-foot crate, in which they can lie down but not turn. “I

On What the Animal Ag Alliance Thinks of Us

Animal Person

They do appear to wish to put an end to what they believe are the worst abuses of institutionalized animal agriculture, such as gestation crates and veal crates, but that's hardly a call to end animal agriculture. Besides, is the "modern" veal crate something to be proud of?

Animal Advocates' Successes Have Factory Farmers Running Scared

Animal Ethics

Consider some of the victories: On November 5th, 2002, more than two and a half million Floridians voted "Yes" on Amendment 10 to amend the state constitution and prohibit the use of gestation crates , narrow metal cages where breeding pigs are kept for most of their lives. On November 7, 2006, Arizonans voted overwhelmingly, by 62 percent, in favor of Proposition 204, to ban the cruel and intensive confinement of veal calves and pregnant pigs on industrialized factory farms.

Reasons Consistently Applied

Animal Ethics

Since the male offspring of dairy cows don't produce milk, they are sold to veal farms, where they are permanently confined in veal crates that prevent them from moving or turning around. So, by purchasing dairy products one is indirectly supporting the inherently cruel veal industry. I suspect that many regular readers of Animal Ethics are already vegetarians.