From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: As Mark Bittman rightly notes, California’s new farm animal welfare law presages what is coming for all farm animal industries nationally (“ Hens, Unbound ,” column, Jan. 1, 2015 The writer is director of advocacy and policy for Farm Sanctuary, a national farm animal protection group The tiny cages and crates that confine about 90 percent of laying hens and more than 80 percent of gestating sows are both physically and mentally tormenting for the animals involved.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

They’re about protecting a system that produces cheap food. That system may treat sentient animals like car parts, ruin antibiotics we need for human medicine, and destroy rural communities by polluting our air and water, but at least it’s “efficient” (a word Mr. Hurst hammers three times). It’s time to send the message that cost is not the only important consideration. Farm Animal Welfare, ASPCA New York, Feb.

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From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Consumers should consider that cows like Edie or Sophia are often fiercely protective, grieving mothers whose anguished cries the farmer undoubtedly heard as he removed their young. To the Editor: In “ Where Cows Are Happy and Food Is Healthy ” (column, Sept. 9), Nicholas D. Kristof describes “happy” cows that are loved “like children” by an organic dairy farmer.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

How far do we go in protecting them? Alexander Mauskop New York, Nov. Cows, domestic sheep, chickens and many others would not survive if they were not raised for human consumption, protected from malnutrition, disease and predators. David Peters New York, Nov.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

It is only the prejudice of our species that justifies culling the deer population while protecting our own. BRANIGAN President, Make Peace With Animals New Hope, Pa., To the Editor: In “ Hunting Deer With My Flintlock ” (Op-Ed, Dec. 26), Seamus McGraw says he has a responsibility to kill deer because there are too many. He has volunteered to kill a deer cruelly, ineptly and with an outdated weapon that causes additional suffering to the deer.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

2): We disagree with your contention that the First Amendment protects animal “crush” videos. And the Supreme Court’s decision is a reminder of the importance of narrowly tailoring this legislation, but it has not determined that these crush videos constitute protected speech. We believe our new legislation will pass constitutional muster. To the Editor: Re “ Disgusting but Not Illegal ” (editorial, Aug.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

If they are, producers are subject to fines up to $37,500 per day under tough new federal regulations. It keeps animals safe and comfortable and protects them from predators and disease. To the Editor: Mark Bittman wants to outlaw confined livestock feeding operations because, he says, they harm the environment, torture animals and make meat less safe (“ A Food Manifesto for the Future ,” column, Feb. We take issue with him on all three points.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

6): I do not agree that “anyone with an appreciation for the First Amendment” must conclude that “crush videos” or videos of vicious dogfights are protected speech and that the federal law in question should therefore be struck down. 7, 2009 To the Editor: You make the argument that the First Amendment has historically protected free discourse and should, in the same spirit, protect depictions of animal cruelty. Mandelker New York, Oct.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The United States Department of Agriculture has been broken for a long time, and it is clear that it cannot protect the American public from illness and death from contaminated meat products. 1, 2010 To the Editor: Your article gave a whole new meaning to “Where’s the Beef?” To the Editor: “ Company’s Record on Treatment of Beef Is Called Into Question ” (front page, Dec.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

New York’s protection of laborers should be a first step toward recognition of the other systemic abuses that occur on farms that, like the long-ignored rights of farm workers, have been constantly disregarded by legislators. To the Editor: The sentence in your Sept.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

It also offers an equally harsh negative judgment of the federal authorities whose mandate is to protect the integrity of the public’s food supply chain but who have chosen to interpret this responsibility so lightly as to let such claims stand while ignoring repeated offenses by the industry. Is it any wonder that cynicism with regard to the efficacy of government is at an all-time high? To the Editor: Re “ The Burger That Shattered Her Life: Trail of E.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

And Mr. Klinkenborg’s conclusion that an international effort similar to what is happening to address the current global financial crisis will be necessary to protect species prompts a question. What would it cost to stabilize our planet’s biological health by protecting species and their natural habitats? An estimated $13 billion a year would be enough to maintain and expand protected areas in the tropics, where the vast majority of plant and animals species are found.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Consumer boycotts and protective laws are desperately needed. For example, while Proposition 2 would provide greater freedom of movement, it would very likely compromise other factors necessary to ensure the overall welfare of the animals, especially with regard to protection from disease and injury. To protect the welfare of the animals as well as the safety of America’s food supply, the A.V.M.A. To the Editor: Re “ Standing, Stretching, Turning Around ” (editorial, Oct.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

And you do not acknowledge the individual care that pigs get in such systems and the protection from predators, diseases and the aggression that pigs often exhibit toward each other in group housing. To the Editor: “ Standing, Stretching, Turning Around ” (editorial, Oct. 9) does little to advance the debate on farm animal housing. It accepts completely the hype concerning a California ballot initiative that among other things bans gestation stalls for pregnant sows.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The Unalienable Rights of Chimps ,” by Adam Cohen (Editorial Observer, July 14): The Spanish Parliament’s decision to grant rights to apes is indeed groundbreaking, and will foster philosophical discussion about animal protection for some time. But Americans need not await the resolution of the academic debate, which is more about form than substance, before acting to protect animals. To the Editor: “ What’s Next in the Law?

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Animal Ethics

During training with active sonar, we protect marine mammals by employing rigorous protective measures. Such protective measures were developed in concert with, and were approved by, federal environmental regulators. To the Editor: Re “ Of Whales and National Security ” (editorial, July 2): Today’s threats to national security are not “exaggerated”; they are increasing.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Mustangs Stir a Debate on Thinning the Herd ” (front page, July 20): The Bureau of Land Management is charged with protecting wild horses and burros on the Western rangelands. Faced with budgetary constraints, however, it might put to death some of the 30,000 horses it is holding—a herd as big as the community of free horses still roaming the West. You report that Steven L.

From Yesterday's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ A Disgraceful Farm Bill ” (editorial, May 16): While the farm bill recently approved by Congress deals with enormous agricultural policy issues, it also includes three important provisions to protect animal welfare. The bill contains sweeping new penalties against animal fighting, included after the Michael Vick case revealed the pervasiveness of this crime. These new penalties would give the law some much needed teeth.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: In his past comments about protecting animals and nature, Pope Benedict XVI is building upon the Roman Catholic Church’s tradition of promoting faithful stewardship of all creatures (“ A Cat Lover in the Vatican Strikes a Chord With Cat Lovers Around the World ,” news article, April 20). The United Methodist Church supports the humane treatment of farm animals and calls for the protection of endangered species.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ On the Ground, Counting Deer ” (New Jersey and the Region, May 4) and the efforts of Essex County officials to justify the deer hunt in South Mountain Reservation: When I moved to New Jersey from New York City 13 years ago, I was enchanted to encounter deer in a forest two blocks from my house in South Orange (which abuts the reservation).

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Earlier this month, NASA released new satellite photographs showing continued illegal cutting of the Mexican fir forests where virtually all of eastern North America’s monarch butterflies spend the winter. Migratory birds protect forests and crops from insect pests; butterflies, bats and other migratory species are important pollinators.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Allan Kornberg Boston, March 11, 2008 The writer is executive director of the World Society for the Protection of Animals To the Editor: Thank you for publicizing the plight of satos—street dogs—in Puerto Rico in “ Scrutiny for Puerto Rico Over Animal Treatment ” (news article, March 9).

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Ratification of the Law of the Sea would send an important message to the more than 150 countries that have already joined the treaty, including all of our allies, that we are committed partners in protecting the planet and its people. To the Editor: Re “ Oceans at Risk ” (editorial, March 9): We are in danger of ruining the world’s oceans and endangering marine ecosystems.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

24) regarding the dangers of eating bluefin tuna because of high levels of mercury did not mention (as The Times has done on previous occasions) another, equally compelling reason to avoid consuming the meat of this fish: the bluefin tuna has been so overexploited that the species is on the brink of extinction. Gil Kulick New York, Jan. To the Editor: Both your Jan. 23 front-page article and your editorial (“ Tuna Troubles ,” Jan.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

At the same time connections between the food industry and government agencies like the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration have become so incestuous that we should expect little from them. Vigilance in our food system is critical because bacterial pathogens will change and new ones will emerge. The federal government needs to recommit itself to putting boots on the ground in America and elsewhere to inspect and protect our food supply.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

While Alaska is increasingly devastated by global warming—melting glaciers, permafrost and sea ice, as well as the severe impacts on wildlife, ecosystems and people—she seems to be working not to protect the polar bear or ultimately the citizens of her state, but to make sure nothing gets in the way of energy company plans for expansion. Instead, it simply seeks to protect bears in the absence of a better national approach to climate change.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: It is deeply troubling that a legally mandated and urgently needed decision to protect polar bears under the Endangered Species Act has been delayed by one agency of the Interior Department even as another agency rushes ahead with plans to sell oil and gas leases across a huge expanse of critical polar bear habitat in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea (“ Regulatory Games and the Polar Bear ,” editorial, Jan.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

16): As a New Yorker who cringes with disgust and shame every time I pass an overloaded horse-drawn carriage dragging tourists around the streets of this horribly congested city, I was shocked and appalled by yet another incident leading to the death of an innocent animal. The recent report by the New York City comptroller points out the absolute failure of city agencies to protect these indentured slaves. Zelda Penzel New York, Sept.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: “ A Factory Farm Near You ” (editorial, July 31) is in a time warp. Producers like me are ready to comply with tough new Environmental Protection Agency regulations that protect the nation’s water supply, by adopting a policy of zero discharge into rivers and streams. Yes, concentrated animal feeding operations, or “factory farms” as you call them, are a key feature of modern agriculture.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The rooster watches over the flock protectively and often participates in a hen’s egg-laying ritual, an extremely important and private part of her life. To the Editor: Re “ Suddenly, the Hunt Is On for Cage-Free Eggs ” (front page, Aug. 12): While this is a step in the right direction toward reducing the animal abuse inherent in all factory farming (from the chicken’s point of view), it’s still a long way from what nature intended.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

But one thing they all have in common is the strongest desire imaginable to love you, protect you and bond with you. To the Editor: “ My Dog Days ,” by Arthur Phillips (Op-Ed, June 10), gave me those warm, fuzzy feelings and made my eyes tear. People who adopt from animal shelters will tell you that it’s not only a rewarding experience, but also that shelters are filled with a smorgasbord of the most amazing, delightful, intelligent dogs you’ll ever find on the planet.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Japan’s Whaling Obsession ” (editorial, April 1): Japan strongly supports the international protection of endangered whale species and advocates for the sustainable harvest of species in abundance only. Japan is sincerely committed to researching whales’ dietary habits and nutrition status, as well as the shift in whale populations by age over time. Japan Information Center Consulate General of Japan New York, April 4, 2007

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

In the United States pork industry, the vast majority of the more than 100 million pigs raised each year are housed in climate-controlled buildings that protect them from the elements, illness and disease and that allow for individual care. To the Editor: Re “ Mr. Puck’s Good Idea ” (editorial, March 26): Thank you for writing about the restaurateur Wolfgang Puck and his desire to buy meat raised humanely. This issue is an important one and needs to be talked about.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

For many producers, treating pigs humanely means raising them in climate-controlled facilities; safeguarding them from biosecurity hazards and the threat of diseases; placing sows in crates to stop them from fighting with one another and protect their piglets from being crushed; to ensure that they get the feed and water needed; and to better monitor their health.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

And I would have to make a report to the United States Department of Agriculture any time a hen gets out and runs onto the neighbor’s property, or pay a $1,000 fine. I hope everyone who prefers local and pasture-raised animals will speak up and protect the source of their food and health. To the Editor: Re “ Plan for Tracking Animals Meets Farmers’ Resistance ” (news article, Dec. 13): I live in rural Pennsylvania. I have one older riding horse and occasionally some laying hens.

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Congo Rebels Claim They Are Protecting the Gorillas

Critter News

This New York Times article doesn't have much new to report. We are protecting them,” said Babu Amani, a rebel spokesman. France began circulating a draft resolution on Monday that would temporarily authorize an additional 3,085 troops and police officers for the peacekeeping mission in the Congo to protect civilians in the eastern part of the country. I did notice this though.

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Asian Countries Score Another Victory Over Marine Animals

Critter News

Delegates to the CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) conference in Qatar voted down three of four proposals to protect sharks. According to the New York Times. This really sucks. China, by far the world’s largest consumer of the cartilaginous fish, for sharkfin soup, and Japan, which has battled to keep the convention from being extended to any marine species, led the opposition.

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The Blue House Dog

4 The Love Of Animals

A New York Times story that ran in 2001 about a homeless dog wandering around a suburban part of New York City, struck a chord with me. Today we have a lovely guest post from author Deborah Blumenthal.

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Canis Lupus

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about gray wolves, who are no longer on the protected list in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. If you haven't read Barry Holstun Lopez 's 1978 book Of Wolves and Men , you should do so. It changed my life