From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

31) is simply wrong in suggesting that grass-fed beef produces less methane than feed-lot meat. In any case, globally, only 8 percent of all meat is produced in natural grazing systems, and there is little available unforested land suitable for such systems. To replace factory-farmed meat without further tropical forest destruction is impossible. Peter Singer Geoff Russell Barry Brook New York, Nov.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The meat industry loves to squeal that “the cost of bacon will rise” whenever it’s faced with pressure to change. Farm Animal Welfare, ASPCA New York, Feb. In addition, producing more meat worsens worldwide hunger and food insecurity by dedicating precious farmland and water resources to the production of animal feed. To the Editor: Re “ Don’t Presume to Know a Pig’s Mind ” (Op-Ed, Feb.

Sustainable Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times op-ed column about "sustainable meat

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From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

He says he hunts out of a need to take responsibility for his family, who evidently live where the supermarkets offer no meat. He says meat tastes more precious when you’ve watched it die. BRANIGAN President, Make Peace With Animals New Hope, Pa., To the Editor: In “ Hunting Deer With My Flintlock ” (Op-Ed, Dec. 26), Seamus McGraw says he has a responsibility to kill deer because there are too many.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Hooked on Meat ,” by Mark Bittman (column, June 2): The other day, I asked the manager of our local chain grocery store why we were offered only Peruvian asparagus in the springtime. Why do we eat so much meat? Health care skyrockets out of control mainly because we have no convenient access to fresh produce and tasty, humanely raised meat products.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

But the vested interests are very strong, and consumers have become accustomed to artificially low prices for meat. His new column offers hope for animals and help for people. 2, 2011 Note from KBJ: Only someone who doesn't understand torture could think that meat production involves torture. Meat production may be cruel or inhumane, but it is not, literally, torturous To the Editor: Re “ A Food Manifesto for the Future ” (column, Feb.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Let’s tell people of the quantum jump in energy efficiency that could be accomplished by eating less meat and having what meat is eaten be grass fed and pasture raised by local farmers. It’s easy to cut meat consumption if you start with one day a week of no meat. Bonnie Lane Webber New York, Jan.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Niman gives us is to pay attention to the source of meat products and what our mothers always told us: clean your plate. To the Editor: The claims Nicolette Hahn Niman makes for how greenhouse gases might be reduced while still eating meat may very well be true, and I do not have the expertise to challenge them. What would the cost of a hamburger at Burger King or McDonald’s be if the meat were to come from Ms. What is greener than forage-fed meat?

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Go vegan, go vegetarian, go humane or just eat less meat. Alexander Mauskop New York, Nov. Indeed, many paleoanthropologists maintain that the evolution of the large, energy-hungry human brains depended on a transition of our ancestors’ diets to include meat. David Peters New York, Nov. To the Editor: Re “ Animal, Vegetable, Miserable ,” by Gary Steiner (Op-Ed, Nov.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “Officials Point to Swine Flu in New York” (front page, April 26): Dare we ask why this happening [sic]? What will it take for us, and our public health leaders, to question our addiction to meat and tolerance of factory farming? The meat industry is environmentally devastating, incredibly inhumane and now potentially the end to us all.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ More Perils of Ground Meat ” (editorial, Jan. Jeremy Russell Director of Communications and Government Relations National Meat Association Oakland, Calif., 10): Instead of encouraging efforts to improve food safety, you demonize a company that had the courage to invest in innovative technology proved to be effective in reducing dangerous pathogens. The American food safety system is the highest standard in the world, and our ground beef is the safest.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The United States Department of Agriculture has been broken for a long time, and it is clear that it cannot protect the American public from illness and death from contaminated meat products. Why not add only ground fat belonging to the meat being ground? By approving the revolting and often ineffective use of ammonia to sanitize the results of substandard meat processing, it has chosen the profits of big business over food safety for all Americans.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ From Hoof to Dinner Table, a New Bid to Cut Emissions ” (front page, Dec. Of course, the meat is more expensive since it takes lots of real estate to freely graze a herd, and it’s tougher than typical supermarket fare (Americans are used to a style of marbling that’s caused by grain diets and flabby cattle, whereas grass-fed cows are trim from their daily ambles). But the leaner meat from grass-fed animals actually tastes richer and more savory.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

It’s a terrible but ultimately not surprising tale, given the continued lack of self-regulation and the emphasis on profit over safety in the meat industry. The only way the meat industry will change its ways is for people to stop buying ground beef and cause sales to plummet. coli O157:H7 and other disease-causing microbes from raw meat and poultry. The Food and Drug Administration approved irradiation as safe and effective for use on poultry in 1992 and on meat in 1997.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The meat and dairy industries want to keep their operations away from the public’s discriminating eyes, but as groups like PETA and the Humane Society have shown us in their graphic and disturbing undercover investigations, factory farms are mechanized madness and slaughterhouses are torture chambers to these unfortunate and feeling beings. Irene Muschel New York, April 9, 2009 To the Editor: Nicholas D. To the Editor: Re “ Humanity Even for Nonhumans ,” by Nicholas D.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Kristof , I’m not opposed to hog farmers or people consuming meat. But we are paying the price for having as much meat as we want, whenever we want, and cheaply, too. To the Editor: Like Nicholas D. Millions of animals cannot be forced to grow on schedule without subjecting them to conditions that require the use (and abuse) of antibiotics. Technology can control nature only for so long.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Rethinking the Meat-Guzzler ” (Week in Review, Jan. 27): Mark Bittman answered my prayers by writing an article exposing how the meat industry contributes to global warming, world hunger and other issues plaguing our world. Elaine Sloan New York, Jan. But much more attention and discussion needs to be directed to the meat industry, particularly its barbaric treatment of the helpless animals that are in our servitude.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ PETA’s Latest Tactic: $1 Million for Fake Meat ” (news article, April 21): The commercial development of meat from animal tissue won’t result in “fake meat” any more than cloning sheep results in fake sheep. Quite the contrary, lab-based techniques have the potential to yield far purer meat, uncontaminated with growth hormones, pesticides, E. A more accurate name for the end result would therefore be “clean meat.”

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The fact that geese mate for life, and that the mate of the poor goose that was slaughtered would step forward, was enough to make me swear off meat forever, if I hadn’t already. Bernard Burlew New York, July 31, 2008 To the Editor: While I am grateful for Nicholas D. I hope he also knows that choosing a meat-based diet contributes to environmental devastation, involves a disproportionate use of the earth’s resources and causes untold health problems.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

But there is a net loss in all meat production, not just of farmed fish or feeding fish to land animals being raised for food. And while there are varying estimates, it takes between 3 and 15 pounds of grain to produce a pound of meat. I also applaud your suggestion that people eat less meat, but eating no meat whatsoever is the most sustainable diet of all. But “encouraging healthy, less meat-based eating habits” will do nothing to ameliorate the situation.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Yet Al Gore does not even mention the need for Americans to reduce meat consumption as we attempt to rescue ourselves from the climate crisis. To the Editor: The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization has estimated that nearly a fifth of the world’s greenhouse gases is generated by livestock production, more than by transportation. Michael Radkowsky Washington, Nov.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

24) regarding the dangers of eating bluefin tuna because of high levels of mercury did not mention (as The Times has done on previous occasions) another, equally compelling reason to avoid consuming the meat of this fish: the bluefin tuna has been so overexploited that the species is on the brink of extinction. Gil Kulick New York, Jan. To the Editor: Both your Jan. 23 front-page article and your editorial (“ Tuna Troubles ,” Jan.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

about the world food crisis, Paul Krugman doesn’t mention an obvious and important solution: Eat less meat. With a little experimentation, anyone can find satisfying substitutes for meat that will improve personal health and the health of the planet at the same time. To the Editor: In answering the question “What should be done?” The 700 calories’ worth of animal feed he says it takes to produce 100 calories of beef contributes nothing to the well-being of consumers.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Cholesterol is found only in foods derived from animals, like meat, cheese and eggs. To the Editor: Re “ Cholesterol Drugs for 8-Year-Olds ” (editorial, July 10): Eight-year-olds do not need to be put on cholesterol drugs. Cholesterol levels can be controlled by eating healthy food and getting exercise. Humans, and most animals, produce cholesterol naturally, but the problem is when we “supplement” this biologically occurring substance.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Reducing meat consumption, particularly of beef, is one of the simplest and most rewarding things we can do. To the Editor: I noticed that the sustainability house at Oberlin College enjoys barbecues with burgers and grilled corn. Is it possible that for all their water-saving tactics, the students have overlooked a way to save huge amounts of water: cutting out beef? It can take an estimated 2,500 gallons of water to produce one pound of beef.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To preserve the effectiveness of our antibiotics, all meat producers need to back away from the overuse of drugs. Slaughter Member of Congress, 28th District, New York Washington, Sept. To the Editor: Re “ Antibiotic Runoff ” (editorial, Sept.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

If Mr. Nocera actually had such clairvoyant powers over the meat-packing industry, why didn’t he put them to use last autumn and blow the whistle on the Westland/Hallmark slaughter plant? To the Editor: Re “ A Case of Abuse, Heightened ,” by Joe Nocera (Talking Business column, March 8): Mr. Nocera tells us that most slaughterhouses don’t mistreat animals or funnel sick downer cows into the food chain. Oh, really?

Cloned Meat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about the cloning of animals for meat

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From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

21, 2008 To the Editor: The correct response to “The Biggest Beef Recall Ever” is to not just be appalled and sickened at the horrifying treatment of living beings at the Westland/Hallmark Meat Company plant, but to realize that this is almost certainly just the tip of the iceberg, that not just cows are being tortured, but pigs, turkeys, chickens, calves and sheep. The vast number of meat eaters brake for geese, call the A.S.P.C.A. To the Editor: Your Feb.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

The United States Department of Agriculture purchases food, including high-fat meat and dairy products, under the direction of Congress based on agricultural surpluses and price support activities to help American agriculture producers. But like sodas and sugary snacks, meat and dairy products also play a role in our children’s expanding waistlines. The cheeseburgers and meat tacos our children eat at school also deserve our full attention.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

As a longtime vegan with three vegan-from-birth children, I would like to suggest that since vegetarians are generally healthier than meat eaters, there is no excuse for compassionate people to eat animals. To the Editor: Re “ Two Pigs ” (The Rural Life, Oct. 25): Thank you for another thoughtful piece by Verlyn Klinkenborg, who admirably makes the point that taking an animal’s life should not be a cavalier endeavor.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Ross Smith New York, May 21, 2007 To the Editor: I am shocked by the ignorance of the recent outcry against vegan diets in the media, most recently Nina Planck’s article about the dangers and irresponsibility of vegan diets during pregnancy and infancy. Kelly New York, May 21, 2007 To the Editor: Thank you for publishing Nina Planck’s excellent article, “Death by Veganism.”

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

2): Yes, 100 years ago Upton Sinclair wrote a book about the plight of the immigrant and focused in part on the meat industry. But 100 years later, our industry has been transformed and our meat supply is among the safest, most abundant and certainly the most affordable anywhere in the world. Today’s meat plants operate in carefully controlled, high-tech environments that approach operating-room levels of sanitation.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Horse slaughter for meat export is just plain wrong. Hope Ryden New York, March 5, 2007 The writer is the author of a book about America’s last wild horses To the Editor: Re “ We Eat Horses, Don’t We? ,” by Christa Weil (Op-Ed, March 5): Ms. Weil’s paean to horsemeat should be taken with a grain of salt. The fact that horsemeat has at times been part of humanity’s diet is not in dispute. But yesterday’s hardship food is today’s gourmet treat.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Mr. Puck’s Good Idea ” (editorial, March 26): Thank you for writing about the restaurateur Wolfgang Puck and his desire to buy meat raised humanely. This issue is an important one and needs to be talked about. If we are to live in a more peaceful world, we must abandon the cruelty on our plates. Kristina Cahill Long Beach, Calif., March 27, 2007 To the Editor: Livestock producers raise their animals under humane standards and under the care of a veterinarian.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

I buy pasture-raised meat, milk and eggs from local farmers who I know personally, because the animals are healthier than industrially raised animals, and I find that the quality is better. To the Editor: Re “ Plan for Tracking Animals Meets Farmers’ Resistance ” (news article, Dec. 13): I live in rural Pennsylvania. I have one older riding horse and occasionally some laying hens.

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"A Meat-Crazed Society"

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times op-ed column by philosopher Gary Steiner

In Vitro Meat

Animal Ethics

PETA is offering a $1,000,000 reward to anyone who creates commercially viable in vitro meat. I don't see any ethical problem with producing or consuming such meat. Addendum: Here is a New York Times story about the reward Do you?

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Roger Scruton on the Duty to Eat Meat

Animal Ethics

We should not abandon our meat-eating habits, but remoralize them, by incorporating them into affectionate human relations, and using them in the true Homeric manner, as instruments of hospitality, conviviality and peace. Furthermore, I would suggest not only that it is permissible for those who care about animals to eat meat; they have a duty to do so. If meat-eating should ever become confined to those who do not care about animal suffering then compassionate farming would cease.

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Meat and Romance

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about mixed couples, and no, I'm not talking about race, religion, or politics

Seal

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about seal meat

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Getting Your Goat

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about goat meat

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750+ Geese Rounded Up For Slaughter at Jamaica Bay

10,000 Birds

New York City’s premiere wildlife refuge proved to be no refuge for Canada Geese on Monday morning as federal agents rounded up 711 geese – including goslings – and packed them up for a trip to upstate New York where they will be gassed and their meat will be provided to food banks.