Dutch May Ban Kosher Slaughter of Livestock

Critter News

THE DUTCH parliament has voted overwhelmingly to ban the ritual slaughter of livestock. This could halt production of kosher and halal meat in the Netherlands – and lead to similar campaigns in other European countries. kosher Slaughterhouse cows livestock farm animal welfare NetherlandsIt could have a snowball effect for other countries in Europe, although probably it certainly won't be seen as politically correct. Excerpted from the Irish Times.

Roger Scruton on the Duty to Eat Meat

Animal Ethics

We should not abandon our meat-eating habits, but remoralize them, by incorporating them into affectionate human relations, and using them in the true Homeric manner, as instruments of hospitality, conviviality and peace. A great number of animals owe their lives to our intention to eat them.

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Australian Scientists to Study Animal Feelings

Critter News

The purpose is to make them happier as livestock. A team based at the CSIRO aims to use the study to reduce stress and pain in livestock. Advertisement: Story continues below "Ultimately, the outcomes of this research will expand on our understanding of emotional and cognitive functions of livestock and the impacts of farming practices on animal welfare." The research is being funded by Meat and Livestock Australia.

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Terrible News. US Supreme Court Strikes Down California "Downer Cow" Law

Critter News

Clearly a win for the damn livestock industry. A state law mandating "humane treatment" of downed livestock headed for the slaughterhouse was unanimously overturned Monday by the Supreme Court. Supreme Court rules on health care challenge| GPS tracking "The Federal Meat Inspection Act regulates slaughterhouses' handling and treatment of non-ambulatory pigs from the moment of their delivery through the end of the meat production process," wrote Justice Elena Kagan.

Belgian City Goes Vegetarian Once a Week

Critter News

It's their way of acknowledging the impact of livestock on the environment. Not only is there reason to believe that livestock contribute to greenhouse gases, but meat is resource-intensive to produce. A lot of land and money goes into producing meat in a world with diminishing space. Is meat really the best way to feed our growing population? Only when humans start to freak out about their own survival will they stop eating meat.

The True Costs of Eating Meat

Animal Ethics

McWilliams highlights the true environmental costs of eating meat: The livestock industry as a result of its reliance on corn and soy-based feed accounts for over half the synthetic fertilizer used in the United States, contributing more than any other sector to marine dead zones. Livestock production consumes 70 percent of the water in the American West -- water so heavily subsidized that if irrigation supports were removed, ground beef would cost $35 a pound.

Proposed Nebraska Legislation Angers Horse Activists

Critter News

Tyson Larson introduced LB 305 on Wednesday, which would create a state meat inspection program, which would in turn allow horse meat to be transported across state lines. He also introduced LB 306, otherwise known as the Livestock Animal Welfare Act. From the Lexington Clipper-Herald. click here for the full article. Two bills introduced in the Nebraska Legislature are drawing fire from the largest animal advocacy organization in the world. Newcomer to the Legislature Sen.

Steps Towards Ending Factory Farming?

Critter News

A recent agreement between farmers and animal rights activists here is a rare compromise in the bitter and growing debate over large-scale, intensive methods of producing eggs and meat, and may well push farmers in other states to give ground, experts say. The rising consumer preference for more “natural” and local products and concerns about pollution and antibiotic use in giant livestock operations are also driving change.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Mark Bittman wants to outlaw confined livestock feeding operations because, he says, they harm the environment, torture animals and make meat less safe (“ A Food Manifesto for the Future ,” column, Feb. Modern livestock housing is temperature-controlled, well lighted and well ventilated. As for “sustainable” alternatives, perhaps they can produce enough meat for the wealthy, but not for a world population that is growing and demanding more protein.

Agriculture Fears Possible "Cow Tax"

Critter News

The ag industry really fears that the government may start taxing them for heads of livestock because of their contribution to global warming. This country needs to eat less meat. I don't know how seriously to take this, or if it's just the ag industry pulling an NRA stunt (ie. knee-jerk reaction to anything and everything.) There was} a proposal Thursday, Dec. 4, 2008 by the Environmental Protection Agency to charge a fee for air-polluting cows and hogs.

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Are Farm Animals Usually Killed in a Humane Manner?

Critter News

The meat industry will say yes, of course, all animals are treated and killed humanely. For some people, it is inhumane to eat meat in any situation, no matter how well the animal is treated prior to and during slaughter. There is an abundance of information on the web about undercover investigations, livestock conditions, slaughter procedures, etc. You are not processing their wellbeing, but their carcasses for meat.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization has estimated that nearly a fifth of the world’s greenhouse gases is generated by livestock production, more than by transportation. Yet Al Gore does not even mention the need for Americans to reduce meat consumption as we attempt to rescue ourselves from the climate crisis.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Rethinking the Meat-Guzzler ” (Week in Review, Jan. 27): Mark Bittman answered my prayers by writing an article exposing how the meat industry contributes to global warming, world hunger and other issues plaguing our world. All those who care about proper nutrition must look at the developing science, which may suggest that diet should be customized: some may need to decrease their consumption of grains and increase their consumption of meat.

Michael Fox on Vegetarianism

Animal Ethics

The strongest part of [Peter] Singer's case against meat eating is his brief discussion of the world food crisis. More specifically, they eat far more meat than is necessary to maintain adequate nutrition. Modern livestock farming on a grand scale also wastes a colossal amount of feed grains on animals which, in times past, would simply have fed off the land. It is a patent truth that by any conceivable health standards most North Americans are overfed.

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From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Of course, the meat is more expensive since it takes lots of real estate to freely graze a herd, and it’s tougher than typical supermarket fare (Americans are used to a style of marbling that’s caused by grain diets and flabby cattle, whereas grass-fed cows are trim from their daily ambles). But the leaner meat from grass-fed animals actually tastes richer and more savory. The other problem with meat consumption is proportion.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ PETA’s Latest Tactic: $1 Million for Fake Meat ” (news article, April 21): The commercial development of meat from animal tissue won’t result in “fake meat” any more than cloning sheep results in fake sheep. Quite the contrary, lab-based techniques have the potential to yield far purer meat, uncontaminated with growth hormones, pesticides, E. A more accurate name for the end result would therefore be “clean meat.”

Reasons Consistently Applied

Animal Ethics

According to the Food and Agricultural Organization's own report entitled Livestock's Long Shadow : "The livestock sector emerges as one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global. Livestock's contribution to environmental problems is on a massive scale." I suspect that many regular readers of Animal Ethics are already vegetarians.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

962), which would phase out antibiotics use in livestock for growth or preventative purposes unless manufacturers could prove that such uses don’t endanger public health. To preserve the effectiveness of our antibiotics, all meat producers need to back away from the overuse of drugs. To the Editor: Re “ Antibiotic Runoff ” (editorial, Sept.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Mr. Puck’s Good Idea ” (editorial, March 26): Thank you for writing about the restaurateur Wolfgang Puck and his desire to buy meat raised humanely. March 27, 2007 To the Editor: Livestock producers raise their animals under humane standards and under the care of a veterinarian. This issue is an important one and needs to be talked about. If we are to live in a more peaceful world, we must abandon the cruelty on our plates. Kristina Cahill Long Beach, Calif.,

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

In the past decade, for instance, we have doled out more than $3 billion in direct subsidies to large-scale livestock producers. The fact that geese mate for life, and that the mate of the poor goose that was slaughtered would step forward, was enough to make me swear off meat forever, if I hadn’t already. But one consequence that Mr. Kristof doesn’t note is that meat prices would certainly be substantially higher.

Animal Advocates' Successes Have Factory Farmers Running Scared

Animal Ethics

One outspoken proponent of factory farming cited in the HPMAJ column is "Trent Loos, a rancher, journalist and vocal livestock supporter." According to the HPMAJ column, "Loos told cattle producers the livestock industry must show the public that there are moral and ethical justifications for taking the life of an animal to feed a person. A column entitled "Ag Industry Threatened by Animal Rights" appeared in today's High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal [ HPMAJ ].

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