Health and Morals

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times op-ed column about free-range pigs. He seems to think that the demand for free-range pork is a demand for wild pork, when in fact it's a demand for morally acceptable conditions for the pigs. In other words, people want to eat not wild pigs but domestic pigs raised in humane conditions The author is confused.

"Educate, Investigate, Liberate"

Animal Person

We are currently doing an investigation on pig farms in Spain, including intensive and extensive/free-range farms (tho extensive ones are scarce since intensive ones are the majority in the industry). So, I thought you could be interested in helping us to raise the funds. Showing people what goes on at "free-range" farms, for me, has always been a powerful part of my vegan advocacy efforts because that's always the fall-back position of the person I'm speaking with. (As

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Note to Those Wanting Promotion: Pay Attention

Animal Person

From the 6th -10th of July we are asking everyone to get their aprons on and bake with free-range or organic eggs. By encouraging people to bake with higher welfare eggs (as well as organic milk, butter and chocolate) vital funds will be raised to campaign against battery cages. We bloggers often get e-mails from individuals and organizations in search of promotion. And that's fine, as we all want to spread the news of fantastic work that needs support.

On a New Level of Absurdity in the Slaughter Business

Animal Person

While plenty of people pay attention to the question of what it means to raise an animal humanely, far fewer stop to consider the notion—and the ostensible paradox—of humane slaughter." Words like 'pastured,' 'grass-fed,' and 'free-range' are now synonymous with quality meat; they carry a potent if symbolic meaning that has eased many a consumer’s conscience and driven many a marketing campaign."

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

Animals raised for food suffer miserably. The overwhelming passage in November of Proposition 2 in California, which banned tight confinement of many of the animals raised for food, is a fine example of the power of publicity to educate people about the atrocities we commit to those animals who have no voice of their own. They deserve recognition and support for offering Americans an alternative to meat raised in confined spaces.

From Today's Wall Street Journal

Animal Ethics

Dogs were bred to be companion animals; pigs and cows are raised as food. Rather than eating dogs, we all ought to eat exclusively small-farmed, free-range meat. Jonathan Safran Foer's pup-in-cheek essay " Let Them Eat Dog " (Weekend Journal, Oct. 31), while humorous enough, masks more serious issues. Beyond the environmental impacts of meat production there is a basic ethical issue involved.

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

As a parent of young children, I have much to worry about regarding what my children eat—a balanced, wholesome diet, free from antibiotics, hormones or bacteria. But the method she advocates for reaching those goals—raising grass-eating, pasture-foraging farm animals—would appear to be notoriously difficult to reproduce on a scale large enough to harvest enough meat, at a reasonable cost, for all the people wanting to eat meat in this country, let alone the world.