August, 2007

Does the End Justify the Means?

Animal Ethics

How many of you think this sort of behavior helps animals, in the long run? How many of you think it hurts them

2007 40

From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Hello! The volume „Tierrechte – eine interdisziplinäre Herausforderung“ (literally „Animal Rights – an interdisciplinary challenge“ has just been released from Harald Fischer Verlag (publisher), Germany. Basis of this collection are the interdisciplinary lectures on Animal Rights which took place from April to October 2006 at Ruprecht-Karls-University in Heidelberg (Germany).

2007 40

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Jean Kazez

Animal Ethics

Here is a blog by one of my fellow graduate students at the University of Arizona. (I I will add it to the blogroll.) Jean and I overlapped by one year: August 1987 (when she arrived in Tucson) to August 1988 (when I departed for College Station, Texas). Jean teaches philosophy just down the road from me at Southern Methodist University. Want to hear something weird? I mentioned Jean in my journal 20 years and four days ago (on 24 August 1987).

2007 40

Animals

Animal Ethics

Is there a morally relevant difference between hunting and dogfighting, such that only the latter is wrong? If there is no morally relevant difference between these activities, then either both are right or both are wrong. Which is it? Addendum: Let me put it formally. The following propositions are inconsistent: 1. Hunting is morally acceptable. Dogfighting is morally unacceptable. There is no morally relevant difference between hunting and dogfighting.

2007 40

Animal Rights: Unleash the Beast

Speaker: A bear

A

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “ Virus Spreading Alarm and Deadly Pig Disease in China ” (Business Day, Aug. 16): Given our exportation of large-scale intensive confinement facilities, it is tragic, though not surprising, that disease is devastating the Chinese industry. With this industrialization often comes overcrowding, inadequate ventilation and related physiological stress—factors implicated as heightening the risk of disease outbreaks.

From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Dear Friends Who Love Animals, I am writing to ask you to help me get the word out about a wonderful free service to your patrons/customers. Any links you can put up to our site will be helpful to them. Forwarding this email to any other people or groups who may be interested is also appreciated. We are the Interfaith Association of Animal Chaplains. We provide scriptural / spiritual support and free phone counseling to bereaved pet owners.

2007 40

More Trending

From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Hello Keith, Mylan, and Jonathan We stumbled across your very worthy site and read some recent posts. you have a very interesting blog! We’re going to go and have an in-depth look this morning, in the meantime, please take a look at our website. It is an animated website aimed at educating and inspiring children about endangered species, and all of our characters actually exist in a real-life camp in Tanzania which protects black rhino and wild African hunting dogs.

2007 40

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: Re “An Ape Types in Iowa” (column, Aug. 9): Gail Collins writes: “Human-ape conversation was a very hot topic back in the late 1960s, when researchers first taught a chimpanzee named Washoe to use sign language. It lost steam once it became clear that while the apes could put together simple statements and requests, they were not prepared to have discussions about their deepest feelings, hopes and dreams.

Bison

Animal Ethics

Buffalo meat is all the rage. See here

Cage-Free Eggs

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about the latest hot thing

Accept this

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: “ A Factory Farm Near You ” (editorial, July 31) is in a time warp. Yes, concentrated animal feeding operations, or “factory farms” as you call them, are a key feature of modern agriculture. And, yes, they are increasing in number as farmers attempt to survive the challenges of modern global agricultural economics. But today these livestock operations don’t have to be unwelcome neighbors in their communities.

Using Cows as a Mere Means to Their Ends

Animal Ethics

Here is a New York Times story about women who sacrifice cows on the altar of romance. What man wouldn't love a woman who's that shallow? I like the part about vegetarians being pretentious and neurotic. Could anything be more idiotic

2007 40

One Mind at a Time

Animal Ethics

A reader sent a link to this column, which raises the perennial question of how best to change society. Resorting to violence against person or property is not in the long-term best interests of animals, as Peter Singer has argued. Those who break duly enacted laws should be punished. If they believe the law they've broken is unjust, they should take their punishment as a way of (1) demonstrating their sincerity and (2) opening a dialogue with those who disagree with them.

2007 40

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: “ Should Most Pet Owners Be Required to Neuter Their Animals? ,” by Verlyn Klinkenborg (Editorial Observer, July 30), is right: “The rate at which dogs are purchased and euthanized in this country is not a sign of our affection for them. It’s a sign of our indifference.”

Attend first

Speaker: Hannah Flynn

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From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: “ A Factory Farm Near You ” (editorial, July 31) does not mention any issue of the morality of factory farming—treating living beings as factory products. Cruelty to animals on such a scale should be the centerpiece of any discussion on raising animals for food. The problem is that there is no possible answer to why we allow such cruelty, other than that we are barbarians. Is that why we conveniently omit it from all discussion? Shame on us.

Canine Inequality

Animal Ethics

In terms of welfare (i.e., overall well-being), there is great inequality among dogs. Some, such as my niece's Tag, are utterly spoiled. They have the best food money can buy, climate-controlled shelter, comfortable bedding, ample exercise, liberty to move about, toys to play with, and medical care (including control of parasites). Some dogs have their basic needs satisfied, but little more. Some, sadly, do not have their basic needs satisfied. This latter category includes those that are abused.)

2007 40

From Today's New York Times

Animal Ethics

To the Editor: The real thrust of the American Kennel Club’s opposition to California Assembly Bill 1634 as stated in “ Should Most Pet Owners Be Required to Neuter Their Animals? ” (Editorial Observer, July 30) is not economic but rather that creating a one-size-fits-all law such as mandatory spay and neuter is not a workable, enforceable solution to reduce the diverse demographics of the state’s shelter population.