Meat, Cancer, and the Cumulative Case for Ethical Vegetarianism

Animal Ethics

Ethical vegetarianism is the thesis that killing and eating animals is morally wrong whenever equally nutritious plant-based alternatives are available. The case for ethical vegetarianism starts with several uncontroversial premises. Virtually everyone agrees that: (1) It is wrong to cause a conscious sentient animal to suffer for no good reason. It is not just a few outspoken animal rights fanatics who hold this view. Ethical synergy at work

Growing Meat vs. Going Vegetarian

Animal Ethics

Every day, some people switch from meat-based diets to vegetarian diets. Some people make the switch for ethical reasons, others for health reasons, others out of concern for the environment, and some for a combination of all these reasons. (As Consider, e.g., the traditional low animal-protein diets in rural China and the vegetarian diets of 15 million Jains.) At the same time, try a vegetarian diet for a month.

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From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Dear Keith, I'd like to request a copy of the essay "Simplifying the Case for Vegetarianism" that you praised on your webpage (12 Jan 2007). I also want to take the opportunity to say how much I enjoy reading the excellent insights/arguments/links etc that you've included on Animal Ethics over the years. Many thanks—with all good wishes, Richard Dr. Richard J White Faculty of Development and Society Sheffield Hallam University City Campus Howard Street Sheffield S1 1W

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From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Hi Keith, I am writing to request a copy of "Simplifying the Case for Vegetarianism." This is one of the best essays I have read on the subject of animal ethics. It is similar to Mylan Engel's essay "The Immorality of Eating Meat" because it is not dependent on any normative ethical theory or any controversial claim to animal equality, but simply shows that if we take animals seriously at all we should not eat animal products (or at least not those produced in factory farms).

2007 40

From the Mailbag

Animal Ethics

Hi Keith, Here are some links to some exceptionally moving and informative online audio lectures on vegetarianism & animal ethics from a Christian perspective. MP3: " Animal Rights & Christian Responsibility " MP3: " Living Toward the Peaceable Kingdom " Notes: " Compassionate Eating as Care of Creation " Notes: " Animal Rights and Christian Responsibility " Thanks, Nathan Nobis

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Reasons Consistently Applied

Animal Ethics

I suspect that many regular readers of Animal Ethics are already vegetarians. That's because those who read Animal Ethics with regularity know that there are many compelling reasons to adopt a vegetarian lifestyle. There are environmental reasons to go vegetarian: The production of animal-derived foods is implicated in every major environmental problem. a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease.

Earth Day Lecture

Animal Ethics

Since a number of "Animal Ethics" readers reside in the northern Illinois area, I thought I would call your attention to an exciting lecture that is taking place on Northern Illinois University's campus. She specializes in Environmental Ethics, Human-Animal Ethics, and Moral Psychology. Some of her notable publications include: “The Power of the Visual,” “Western Environmental Ethics,” “Vices of Inattention,” and “The Moral Responsibilities of Intellectuals.”

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Introducing Myself

Animal Ethics

Currently, I am very interested in social and political philosophy and ethical issues. I felt a strong sense of connection to the ideas of Peter Singer while taking Ethics from Keith. My personal perspective regarding Animal Ethics is not fully formed, which is one of the reasons why Keith and I felt it would be a good idea for me to post on here. I find animals to be valuable for a number of reasons, one of which is for their aesthetic value.

2006 40

Prima Facie vs. Ultima Facie Wrongness

Animal Ethics

Jonathan Hubbell, a philosophy major at the University of Texas at Arlington, is the newest member of the Animal Ethics blog, and once again, I would like to welcome him aboard. Like Keith, I think it will be interesting and instructive to observe as Jonathan works through his views on the myriad of ethical issues that surround our current treatment of animals. It truly is horrific and despicable to treat animals so badly.

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